Decreasing Page Load Time Can Increase Conversions

Do you know that load time of your site can have a big impact on your conversions? KissMetrics in it’s post “Speed Is A Killer – Why Decreasing Page Load Time Can Drastically Increase Conversions” writes:

According to surveys done by Akamai and Gomez.com, nearly half of web users expect a site to load in 2 seconds or less, and they tend to abandon a site that isn’t loaded within 3 seconds. 79% of web shoppers who have trouble with web site performance say they won’t return to the site to buy again and around 44% of them would tell a friend if they had a poor experience shopping online.

 

How to Test your Page Load Time

  1. Page Speed Site from Google http://pagespeed.googlelabs.com/
  2. Web Page Test: http://www.webpagetest.org/
  3. Page Speed Browser Plugin: http://code.google.com/speed/page-speed/
  4. Google Analytics Plugin: http://yoast.com/site-speed-tracking-in-google-analytics/

How to Decrease Page Load Time

Here are some tips from Kissmetrics to reduce your page load time:

  1. Use GZIP compression – it can significantly speed up a site, reducing file size by as much as 70% without degrading the quality of the images, video or the site.
  2. Wrangle Your Javascript and Stylesheets – Have your scripts and CSS load in external files. This way, the browser only has to load the files one time, rather than every time someone visits each page of your site.
  3. Optimize Your Images – In Photoshop or Fireworks, you can use the “Save for Web” option to drastically reduce image size.
  4. Don’t Rely on HTML to Resize Images – HTML (and by extension, WordPress blogs), make it easy to resize the images on the fly before it is shown to the user.  But just because you load that smaller size, doesn’t mean it’s taking up any less room on the server.
  5. Web Cache Me If You Can – Content management systems like WordPress have plugins that will cache the latest version of your pages and display it to your users so that the browser isn’t forced to go dynamically generate that page every single time.
  6. Don’t Confuse the Browser with Redirects – A lot of 301 redirects piled together just confuse the browser and slow it down as it wades through the old destinations to get to the new one.
  7. Let the Network Carry the Load – Content Delivery Networks serve pages from the server located near uses geographical area, which means they get the site to load sooner.

For detailed post please visits,  “Speed Is A Killer – Why Decreasing Page Load Time Can Drastically Increase Conversions”

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